dental care

Is It Normal for My Teeth to Move Immediately After the Braces Come Off?

It is normal for the teeth to “settle” after the braces come off. This settling can result in a bite that is actually better than when the braces were in place. Movement of the front teeth however is undesirable and patients, (and dentists alike) want to prevent it as much as possible. When the braces are on, the teeth are held tightly in place while the doctor carefully positions each one. After the braces come off however, there is no such control. The forces of occlusion, wear, and the tongue come back into play. Even if the teeth are held in place with a bonded retainer after appliance removal, the position of the teeth will still change with time.

Retainers are the key to preventing tooth movement. The most important time to be faithful with your retainer is immediately after your braces come off. Everyone is different and the length of time that retainers must be worn full time varies. Each patient must monitor their own teeth during the first month or two after their braces come off and make sure they wear their retainers at least as much as prescribed, even more if necessary. If you don’t wear your retainers and your teeth move because you didn’t, you may have to have braces again to move things back where they were.

If you are wearing your retainers faithfully and your teeth still move, you may need to have a bonded retainer glued behind them for a while until they are more stable. If you have a tight bite, you may not have room to fit a retainer behind your front teeth. In these cases you will need to let the teeth settle and have the teeth bonded or veneered to close the space. The spaces in these cases are due to the narrow size or shape of the teeth and not their position. Consequently, the “fix” is to change the size of the teeth and not to try and move them again.

If you notice small but progressive changes in the days or weeks after your braces come off, your retainer may need to be adjusted or replaced. The sooner you notice the problem and report it to your orthodontist, the more likely it will be that merely changing or adjusting your retainer will be enough. Clear aligners can also be created to correct minor movements that have occurred. These aligners may then be worn as permanent retainers after the realignment is complete. Bigger movements may require that brackets go back on the teeth for a visit or two. The longer changes are left unaddressed, the more extensive the additional treatment will be.

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Oral hygiene is important- and not just for your smile!!

Dental cavities and tooth decay is one of the most common medical conditions experienced by Americans and the single most common disease of childhood.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 19 percent of children have untreated cavities and approximately 41 percent of children have decay in their “baby teeth.”

Cavities are the result of gradual tooth decay caused by the build-up of plaque and breakdown of protective enamel. Initially cavities are painless, but they open the tooth up to infections, eventually exposure the nerve resulting in pain. The internal structures of the tooth can also be destroyed, ultimately causing the loss of the tooth. While this might not seem important in “baby teeth” as they are going to be lost anyway, infection can cause damage to the growing teeth and subsequent treatments can be painful and expensive.

Overall, oral hygiene is an essential component of one’s health. Researchers from the American Heart Association recently shared findings that professional dental care can reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. Experts tracked 100,000 people for an average of 7 years in Taiwan. They found that those who had their teeth professionally cleaned at least once every two years were 24 percent less likely to have a heart attack and 13 percent less likely to have a stroke.

Regular dentist visits and oral hygiene reduces the growth of inflammation-causing bacteria that causes periodontal disease. However, these bacteria can also cause inflammation of the vessels, with studies showing that these bacteria are associated with elevation in C-reactive protein, a marker for blood vessel inflammation.

Dental health should begin in childhood as even babies are susceptible to cavities. Most children get their first tooth around 6 or 7 months of age and dental care should begin promptly thereafter with a visit to the dentist, as well as, regular tooth brushing. One major risk for early childhood cavities is consumption of sugary liquids, particularly allowing your child to fall asleep with a bottle of juice or milk.

The extended contact with sugar increases the rate of tooth decay. Avoiding sticky foods and frequent snacks are other strategies to ward off cavities. Instilling these routines in childhood promotes their continuation into adult life and with more studies showing broad health benefits from dental hygiene it is essential.

So don’t forget to schedule your six month check up and cleaning!
Call our office today for an appointment.

Understanding Dental Insurance

As dental professionals, we get asked all the time “what is the best insurance?” or a variation of “Why is dental coverage so lousy?”.

And our patients have a point. Dental insurance typically is pretty lousy, for the patient and the dentist. There’s not enough coverage, too many things aren’t covered at all, the co-pays are too high, and the limitations are fairly strict. But why is this so?

And the reason is a fairly simple one, dental insurance is simply not profitable to insurance companies. Now, why isn’t it profitable … well, there are lots of reasons and speculation for that. I wish I could say “well, it’s because of XYZ, and if that gets fixed, it’s all sunshine and rainbows” (or fillings and root canals if you prefer). But that’s just not so.

dental-insurance

But when you change your perspective about dental coverage, you will begin to understand that dental care should not be limited to accommodate what insurance companies will cover. For instance, many dental policies have very strict guideliness that (unfortunately) determine the treatment plan for the patient. These guideliness are a broad “one size fits all” approach to dental care, which really hinders the treatment that a dentist can offer on a case per case basis. If your dentist is only giving you the options that your insurance will cover, chances are you are not getting the whole story about what treatment might be better.

For example, some policies that do not cover endodontic treatment for certain teeth would instead cover an extraction.

The best way to take full advantage of your insurance coverage is by understanding how it works. It may seem daunting at first and each insurance plan is designed differently, however there are some basics that can help you get a better idea of how you’re covered.

If you have the benefit of dental insurance provided by your employer, consider yourself lucky. Think of this benefit as a valuable “coupon” that can greatly reduce the cost of dental care. Almost all dental plans are the result of a contract between your employer and an insurance company. Your dental coverage is not based on what you need or what your dentist recommends. Employers generally choose to cover some, but not all, of employees’ dental costs.

For the most part, insurance coverage is broken down into three or four categories: preventive care, basic, major and orthodontic.

Preventive care is usually covered by the insurance by 100%. Routine cleanings, exams dental xrays, flouride treatment and children’s sealants are usually covered as preventive. However, most insurances limit the frequency of each of these services. Some patients may require to upkeep with more frequent dental cleanings due to active orthodontic treatment or periodontal issues, but insurances will limit the number of times a cleaning can be performed.

Basic care is usually covered at a percentage, leaving the patient with copayments to cover the portions that the insurance will not pay. Additionally, most policies have a yearly deductible that applies for basic work. This deductible can vary for each plan. Usual services under basic care are fillings, deep cleanings, root canals, and some simple extractions among other services.

Major work usually requires a pre approval from the insurance company. If the proposed treatment is approved, the insurance will notify the patient what percentage is their financial responsibility. Most major work consists of prosthetics such as crowns, bridges, partial and complete dentures and occasionally some oral surgery or surgical extractions.

Additionally, some policies may cover braces. Orthodontic treatment is also covered at a percentage of the fees and it needs to be pre approved by the dental insurance. The guideliness they follow to determine eligibility for this service, may not always benefit the patient.

To provide “full coverage,” an insurance company would have to charge more for premiums than a consumer would deem worth spending. So we get this hybrid “this is covered up to that amount/waiting periods/low maximums/no coverage at all” scenario that we’re in. Which really helps nobody — insurance companies don’t like it, as dental profesionals, we don’t like it and patients don’t like it.

There are no easy answers. But at least now you sort of have an inkling as to how dental insurance works.

What do you think about this subject?

Until next time, keep smiling.

by: Paola H

Dentalign studio now offering Insignia braces.

Insignia is the customization of orthodontic braces, made to perfectly model the shape of your teeth and help you achieve a flawless smile. Unlike regular braces, Insignia is the most advanced orthodontic system available today. There are many pros to Insignia as an alternative to regular braces.
Instead of regular, stock braces and arch wires being used on your teeth Insignia customizes a special fit just for you. Also, digital planning and 3D visibility allows your dentist to add precise detail and customization to your teeth instead of eyeing bracket placement with regular braces and manual adjustment, thus saving a lot of time.

Insignia also uses a new digital technology that allows the patient to see what your new smile will look like after the treatment is completed.

The placement of insignia takes much less time and is much more efficient. For example regular braces take approximately two hours for placement, while Insignia takes about forty-five minutes. Thus, customization means less wearing time in braces and also a more comfortable adjustment. Insignia allows for you to achieve the perfect smile, quicker, and more comfortably than ever before.

For further information please call Dentalign Studio (718)821-7432.

By: Lillian B